When it comes to tuning, there's not a single setup that works for every car. That simple rule applies to CarX Drift Racing 2 as well. Even if you search around the internet for a specific car setup, there's a good chance that it won't feel right to you. That's because, at the end of the day, everyone has their own driving style and preference.

With that being said, in this article we will take a look at each individual setting and explain how changing it can affect the car's performance.

Once you understand that, it might still take a lot of fine-tuning and playing around with these settings in order to find your perfect car set up, but it's worth it.

But anyway enough of that, let's get right into our CarX Drift Racing 2 tuning guide!

CarX Drift Racing 2 tuning - Suspensions

CarX Drift Racing 2 wheels and suspension tuning

Spring Size

This is a pretty generic setting that doesn't need a lot of explanation. Adjusting the spring size of your vehicle will determine its height, where the car sits pretty much. It is better to start with this setting before you start playing around with the wheel alignment.

Spring Stiffness

This is a setting that you really need to play around with in order to fully get the feeling of it. Adjusting the spring stiffness will change the way the car responds to bumps and movement in general. Overall, a stiffer spring means more stability but it comes at the cost of less grip on the wheel.

As an example, for cars with high horsepower (HP), a common set up is medium stiffness in the front springs and low in the back.

Sway bar (anti-roll bar)

Increasing the level of this setting affects the vehicle's grip when it comes to cornering. Moving the stiffness balance to the front will increase the grip of the rear axis and that's exactly what you want in most cases, high value up in front and low value in the back.

Wheel Toe

This is a setting that affects the vehicle's overall handling and changing sides. The higher its value is, the narrower the trajectory of the drift. Naturally, a lower value will result in a wider drift trajectory. Typically, you want to have a positive wheel toe value in the front and a negative one in the back.

Wheel Camber

Imagine looking at the car from the front, The wheel camber value is the inward or outward tilt of wheels. A zero degrees camber means that the wheel's surface is perfectly perpendicular to the surface. A large negative value (outward tilt) will increase the car's grip at large drift angles but at the same time, it will reduce grip at small ones. To give you an example, most everyday cars have a slightly more negative camber in the rear wheels to reduce oversteer chances, aka loss of grip in the back. But you are not going to tune an everyday car right?

Caster

By increasing caster angle you get a quicker steering response but going all the way will result in a loss of grip of the front wheels. How high you want to set this value depends on your driving preference.

Ackerman Angle

During high-speed cornering, a positive Ackerman value will increase the drift speed and its trajectory. At the same time, it can make steering harder especially for cars with a smaller steering angle. Therefore, adjust this setting based on the car's power and steering angle while taking into consideration the wheel divergence angle.

Wheel Divergence Angle

This is just the cars steering angle. A higher value means a larger drift angle. Usually, that's a setting that you want to have close to max. As we've mentioned above though, adjust this setting according to the Ackerman angle.

Slow Bump

Slow bump value affects the bump speed of the suspensions and how they react to weight shift (This includes breaking, accelerating and so forth.) A high value will increase the car's stability, but if you go too high you'll make the suspensions overly stiff.

Fast Bump

Similar to Slow Bump, a high value will increase the car's stability by reducing pitching and rolling in sharp side changes but if you go too high you are going to lose traction.

Wheels tuning

Car drifting on the track - CarX Drift Racing 2

Rim Diameter

The bigger the car’s wheels are, the harder it is to spin them since it requires more power. Naturally, a lower rim diameter equals an easier drift start.

Profile Width

A wider profile means more grip but like the rim diameter, higher values make it harder to spin. If you are having understeer issues, you can increase the width on the rear or decrease the front width. For oversteer issues, you want more width on the front or simply less on the rear.

Air Pressure

Lower air pressure means more grip. Too low will slow the car down though so you want to find the right balance. If you are having issues with oversteer you want more pressure on the front tires than the back. The opposite applies when you face understeer.

Profile

Lower value means better control. Usually, you want to keep it around 30%.

Brakes

Brake Momentum

This value is simply the force applied to brakes. A higher value means the faster the vehicle will stop.

Shared to front axis

This is the braking power between axes and it affects the vehicle behaviour during braking while cornering. Of course, it depends on your driving style but setting this value too high can make the car understeer.

CarX Drift Racing 2 tuning final words

There’s no set up that can work for any car or any driving style in CarX Drift Racing 2 or in real life for that matter. With that being said, once you understand what exactly each setting does and how it affects the vehicle, you can adjust it to fit your preferred driving style. We didn’t touch anything engine related in this article as it’s pretty much guaranteed that you are going to max out everything anyway. Take a quick glance at our CarX Drift Racing 2 cars list to decide which vehicles to tinker with.

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