When people think of AndaSeat they think of gaming chairs, maybe they think of the partnerships they've sprung up in eSports, or maybe even the history of the company — which cut its teeth making race car chairs. Few would think of their range of desks, which includes the AndaSeat Mask 2 Gaming Desk we're reviewing today.

It's a sturdy thing, and it's clear that the designers have tried to follow the same design pillars that they did when designing chairs like their T-Pro 2 Series, or Dark Demon. The AndaSeat Mask 2 Gaming Desk feels sturdy, features the almost-obligatory gamer lights, and also comes complete with a lot of extra features and finesse that you won't find on other desks. Carbon steel tube structure, for instance, or a headphone hook, a cable management tray and a cup holder too.

But wait, let's take this back a step. You might have a couple of questions. I know that I certainly have, and I'm writing the article. Firstly, how do you review a desk? and secondly, what is this doing on Pocket Gamer, a site about mobile gaming? Well, the answers are quite simple. You can review anything, it's a reflection (or, 're' viewing, if you like) of something. In this review, we'll discuss the durability and actual assembly of the AndaSeat Mask 2. Maybe after that, I'll review my review, I'm hoping that it'll get top marks.

For the second question, oops, maybe you've caught us out. However, we've previously reviewed board games, computer chairs and more. Dipping into a desk - one of which I certainly do most of my mobile gaming at, due to COVID - isn't too unworldly, and I assure you that we won't be starting to review bus journeys, cars or bespoke yachts off the back of this.

Anyway, back to the desk.

With a feature list that includes a tray for cables, a hook for hanging a set of headphones on, AND a cupholder, the Mask 2 sounds like somebody kept duct-taping DIY projects onto any old desk. That's not the case here though, The integrated headphone hook is rigid and built to the legs, the cup holder and wire management cage have dedicated screw holes, carefully positioned so that they don't cause issues in the leg space.

That said, the latter two parts are, unfortunately, plastic rather than anything hardy, and I actually ended up loosening the cup holder so that I could pivot it under the desk when it's not in use.

Assembly was easy, with the main issue coming from wiring up the lights. You need to feed a wire down the length of the desk without any guide elements. I found this quite tricky because of how the wire had been stored in the box. Where it was folded back on itself many times it kept trying to double back while being fed through the desk. Other than this there were no issues with assembly, although - as with their chairs - it's a hefty thing, so some people might require help for the lifting parts.

The desk itself is a decent width, a proper office desktop. Dimensionally it's 47", 23", 29" in size, with the surface more than big enough to fit two screens and normal other desk toppers. That said, you'll want to consider where it goes in a room based on the lights and the light button; you'll need space free for the right-hand side so that you can access the button.

The AndaSeat Mask 2 Gaming Desk can also hold 150kg, which is the weight of a small tiger, a Panda or 3000 chicken eggs. Now, I don't have any of those laying around the house, so I couldn't confirm, but I did jump on top of it at one point and it was totally fine. The Pocket Gamer technology workshop at its best.

At just under £300 it's much more expensive than the 'easy' route of an Ikea/Argos/Wayfair desk, however, it's stable and stylish. Of course, there's a line between style and garish, and so the lights on the side might not be for everybody. Ignore that though and the sleek, carbon fibre surface is quite appealing, and it's wear-resistant to boot. Sometimes you pay for quality and sometimes you pay for a name. The AndaSeat Mask 2 Gaming Desk is worth the price if it's within your budget.