The PS3 version of Tokyo Jungle was the very definition of a leftfield hit - it seemed to come out of nowhere before securing massive critical acclaim and a large following.

It proved to be so popular that Sony has now released a PlayStation Mobile spin-off, which attempts to streamline the core gameplay for a portable audience.

Like the original game, Tokyo Jungle Mobile sees you taking control of various animals as they attempt to carve out an existence amid the ruins of a deserted city.

It's a dog-eat-dog world - quite literally, in fact, as you get to control several canine protagonists. You'll also marshal other more outlandish beasts, such as lions and even dinosaurs.

Number of the beast

Regardless of which animal you happen to select, the objective is the same: find food and locate a suitable mate.

Depending on the preference of your animal - carnivore or herbivore - food is either other animals or vegetation. Both will need to fight other creatures, and combat is therefore an integral part of Tokyo Jungle Mobile.

Moving and attacking are slightly different here to the home console edition. The shift from 2.5D to an isometric perspective forces you to adapt to a grid-based movement system. Without the useful evasive dash move from the PS3 version you're forced to outflank enemies and use cover more effectively to avoid taking heavy damage in combat.

Keeping your hunger at a manageable level allows you to survive, but sooner or later you need to procreate in order to keep the game going. Marking your territory allows you to secure a mate, and when your offspring arrives it is blessed with your current stats. Your parent animal is replaced by its progeny and the process begins afresh.

Animal kingdom

Lacking the mission-based story mode of the game that inspired it, Tokyo Jungle Mobile is akin to a score attack title - you’re basically trying to see how long you can make your animal's legacy last. Just like the home version, the act of keeping your creature alive against some truly bloodthirsty enemies is thrilling, and the bite-sized chunks of gameplay offered up by this portable entry are ideal for mobile play.

Fans of the original might scoff at the simplified mechanics and comparatively poor visuals - particularly given that the PS Vita should be perfectly capable of replicating the original game.

But if you're playing on less able hardware (a PlayStation-certified mobile phone or tablet) you'll be grateful for the opportunity to sample of one of the most refreshingly innovative titles to come out of Japan in years - even if it is in condensed form.