Speaking out for the first time since having his backside handed to him by EA, Tim Langdell has denied allegations that he is a 'trademark troll'.

According to a lengthy character defence handed to Eurogamer - which attempts to correct a long list of 'misconceptions' about Langdell and Edge Games - it was Edge magazine publisher Future Publishing that demanded Langdell take action to protect the 'Edge' trademark.

The publisher "required Edge to challenge rival attempts to register or use the Edge mark or face severe penalties from Future for failing to do so." Langdell alleges.

"Edge would never have taken the action [against EA] if Future had not required it under the agreement between Future and Edge."

Money changing hands

The document goes on to claim that Langdell has never attempted to extract money from other companies for game licences, and when cash has exchanged hands, it was because the other party was 'happy to offer it'.

Furthermore, the statement also dismisses allegations that Edge Games is 'lawsuit happy'.

"Edge does not make a habit of taking legal action over the Edge mark: in the past 20 years, Edge has only ever taken two legal actions: one against Future Publishing (in 1994) and a second against EA (in 2010) - and the latter was because Future required them to do so."

Finally, the company argues that it's an active game developer that doesn't exist to solely squat on the Edge trademark.

"Despite the false reports, Edge has released a number of games since the mid-1990s, continuously selling and releasing new games at all times from 1984 right through to Bobby Bearing 2 in 2011."

Several new releases are also planned for iPhone, Android, Wii, PS3, Xbox 360, and PC. Apparently.

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